Plan To Come Back - The Great Restart (Vol. 10)

Posted By: Ian Webb Pressing News ,

Sales Opportunities

PLAN TO COME BACK


As we get close to finishing this particularly challenging year, it might be time to look at goal setting for 2021. We have more insight into our sales career, customer base and market segments. How can we use these data points to build a successful plan for next year?

What is a sales plan? And why should you care?

A sales plan is the "who, where, why, when and how" that will guide you to hitting your sales goals for the year.

Big picture aside, a sales plan is a month-to-month forecast of the level of sales you expect to achieve and how you're going to get there. It covers past sales, market concerns, your specific niches, who your customers are, and how you're going to find them, engage with them, and sell to them.

Armed with the information you'll compile within your sales plan, you can quickly identify any upcoming problems, sales droughts, or opportunities—and then do something about them. It may seem like a lot of work to develop a sales plan template at this point, but once you answer all these questions you'll be in a place to take your sales (and brand) to the next level.

1. Set realistic sales goals in your sales plan
Your sales plan needs an end goal. You need a number—either sales or customers or whatever metric you choose—that will tell you whether or not what you've done has been a success. I've written about setting realistic sales goals before, but what it all comes down to is determining what realistically you can bring in based on the size of the market, your goals, and the experience and resources available to you. When setting your sales goals, avoid wishful thinking. You want your business to grow, so it's understandable that you might be over-optimistic in developing your sales plan. Start by looking at last year's forecast and results (give yourself some grace here as 2020 was very unusual). Were you being realistic? For new businesses, avoid working out the level of sales you need to be viable and putting this as your figure.


  1. Define clear deadlines and milestones in your sales plan
    In order to know whether or not the assumptions you're making in your sales plan are close to the mark, you need to break that big number down into smaller expectations with strict deadlines. We call these milestones and they're incredibly handy in tracking whether or not your sales plan is on the right path. Again, start with last year's numbers (if you have them). Track how sales revenues increased or declined annually and compare your company to the industry standards. This will give you a real, frontline take of what milestones to set in your sales plan. Next, it's time to set your milestones. These need to be specific with clear goals and deadlines. For example, you might want to increase your customer base by 20% or increase sales 50% for a specific product. Or even increase the percentage of users on a paid plan by 15% by mid-year. Whatever the milestone is, be clear what your expectations are and set a hard deadline for your team to work towards.

    3. Pick a niche to focus on and build traction in that vertical
    First, we need to know the market we're in and the niche we're going to occupy so we can properly position our business for growth (and to achieve the goals in your sales plan).
    What's a business niche? Essentially, it's what your business specializes in, but it goes a bit deeper than that. A niche is the space your business occupies, not just with your products, but with your content, your company culture, your branding, and your message. It's how people identify with you and search you out over the competition.
  • How big is the market?
  • Is there a built-in demand for what you're selling?
  • What's your current market position: Including any strengths, weaknesses, opportunities or threats?
  • Who are your competitors? What are their strengths, weakness, opportunities, and threats?

A vertical doesn't limit you. It focuses you.

4. Understand your target customers
It makes no sense spending time and money chasing after the wrong prospects, so don't allow them to make their way into your sales plan. Once you know your niche, it's time to dig into finding out as much as possible about your target customer in order to properly sell to them.

So, just what should you look to define about your audience within your sales plan? That depends on your company and your market, but start with basics like company size (in terms of employees or turnover), geographical information, industry, job title, etc.—any traits that are common across your best customers or the types of customers you'd love to have.

Also, don't forget to think about whether they're going to be a good 'fit'. If this is a long-term relationship, you're developing rather than a one-night stand, you want to make sure you're speaking the same language and share a similar culture and vision.

 - Leslie

Management Opportunities 

DOES YOUR ESTIMATOR SET PRICES, PLAN PRODUCTION OR BOTH?

Usually they do both functions by entering job specs into a software package which contains a series of templates for job layout and a set of values for hourly equipment rates and purchase markups as well as detailed information about paper, plate and ink costs. This seems perfectly sensible as we want to charge the customer for what we and product it in the most efficient way possible.

But, does this really make sense? Step back for a moment and really look at the estimates that are produced. First, you will see a great of detail—pounds of ink, number of plates, etc. while the biggest single actual expenditure is just a single number—the cost of the paper. In fact, try an experiment. Pick up a range of estimates and compare the cost of the paper on each to the total estimate. You’ll likely find that they’re closely related. If that’s the case might not the estimate be simply a multiple of the paper cost?

Then, consider the question of pricing. If the price is a function of the estimate, how does the relationship with the customer and he job’s value to them fit into the picture?  Since the customer is the one who will decide to give you the order shouldn’t their buying relationship and the project’s importance to them be central to the price?

What does this suggest as a course of action? First, a simplifies estimating process—cut out all the minutiae. This will simplify production planning and open the door to a laser-like focus on customer value and buying practice

--Bob